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Terms of Reference (ToR)

Impact Assessment of the Baytna Syria Program 2019-2021


BACKGROUND

Baytna is a Syrian-led organization, based in Brussels in Belgium and registered as an association under the name “Association Baytna Pour le Soutien de la Société Civile “. Baytna’s three-year strategic program for 2019-2021 is funded by the Swedish MoFA (SIDA) with a total of 17,250,000 SEK, the Danish MoFA (DANIDA) with a total of 13,000,000 DKK, the Dutch MoFA with a total of 250,000 Euro, the French MoFA with a total of 500,000 Euro, and the Swiss MoFA with a total of 173,000 Euro.

Baytna is established as a response to address the challenges that the Syrian civil society is facing. The organization attracts Syrian civil society organizations (CSOs) and contributes to their institutionalization and project delivery. Baytna is 100% Syrian-led, which means that the organization enjoys broad knowledge about the local context in Syria. Baytna’s mandate covers grant awarding, capacity development, networking, and advocacy.

Baytna’s overall goal for the ongoing program is to empower civil society as a force for democratic change and inclusive peace and stability; to support transitional justice; and to promote respect for human rights and civil liberties using different tools and approaches including advocacy, lobbying, and policymaking.

Baytna’s expected outcomes include that Baytna’s supported civil society groups and activists effectively monitor the governing structures and the democratic processes, and document violations and promote accountability; Baytna’s supported civil society groups and activists foster public participation in policy making and decision-making; Baytna’s supported civil society groups and activists influence national and international policies to contribute to democratic change; and Baytna contributed to a more mature, diverse, and inclusive civil society narrative.

Baytna aims to provide a credible, independent, and sustainable entity capable of networking amongst Syrian CSOs and promoting public participation, accountability, and empowerment. Baytna provides three core services: (1) a hub for Syrian civil society organizations, Syrian refugees, diaspora, and others to meet and coordinate; (2) knowledge capacity building workshops to Syrian CSOs; and (3) small-scale grants to which Syrian CSOs can apply, a mechanism facilitated through its Syria-based field officers. Baytna is using these three core intervention competencies in its three proposed programs for the period 2019-2021: Syrian Online, Syria Inline and Syria Outline.

Baytna’s board of directors is comprised of four prominent Syrian figures, all independent and not

remunerated. The board has a written bylaw and meets at least three times a year. They support the general orientation of Baytna and provides leadership in setting policy, vision, and strategic objectives to the organization.

Baytna consists of four main units: programs, development and quality, admin and finance, and communication all led by the Executive Director of Baytna.

PURPOSE OF THE ASSESSMENT AND INTENDED USE

The main purpose of this impact assessment is to measure through an independent evaluation the changes that can be attributed to the current Baytna’s program.

The purpose of this study can be summarized in terms of accountability and learning; (i) to gather data about the effectiveness and impacts of the program to make sure that the intervention is still on track and is likely to reach its objectives, and (ii) to provide Baytna, the donors and its partners with an input to upcoming discussions concerning the preparation of Baytna’s new strategy for 2022-2024.

For the purposes of this assessment, impact will be understood as the wider effects of the program – social, economic, technical and environment – on individuals (disaggregated by gender and age groups), communities and institutions. The impact can be direct or indirect, intended, or unintended, positive, or negative, macro (within the sector) and micro (household).

The assessment results will generate evidence of key achievements and challenges to inform decision making process for donors,Baytna’s senior management, and key stakeholders as well as providing an opportunity for understanding how the program delivery mechanism works best, under which circumstances, and how this can be improved in the future. In addition, these assessment results are expected to inform the next phase of Baytna and its programming work inside and outside Syria. This impact study will examine Baytna’s program from 2019 through 2021.

This study will mainly focus on the geographical locations, themes and intervention tools covered by the program. Findings and conclusions from this study will be shared with Baytna’s Board of Directors, SIDA, Danish MoFA, French MoFA, Swiss MoFA, Dutch MoFA, and any other potential donor or key stakeholder.

SCOPE OF WORK AND METHODOLOGY

The impact assessment should review all aspects of the current Baytna program. Assessment methodology will include:

  • Desk review: The assessment team will examine project documents, project data, donor grant agreements, subgrant agreements (SGA) with partners inside and outside Syria, projects monitoring and evaluation documents, tracer studies, need assessments, donor proposals, donor progress reports (narrative and financial), external audit reports, internal policies, Baytna’s approved strategy document, guides and training documents and any other relevant documents. The main purpose of this desk review is to build a good understanding of the available information on Baytna within the wider context of civil society support mechanisms before conducting an in-depth study of this intervention. More specifically, this review will aid in understanding the long-term trends in terms of program implementation and outputs since its inception, design of the sampling frame, defining the original scope of this program, geographical coverage, and target populations; determining sampling methodology; and analysing the risks posed by various contextual realities.
  • Case studies: The assessment team may pick 10 to 15 case studies of beneficiaries who successfully completed their projects to study in further depth and to assess the impact on local communities. The team may also want to select a few partner employees who are direct beneficiaries of Baytna capacity development efforts both inside and outside Syria to study in further details the impact on individual and organizational capacity improvement as a result of this program. In addition, case studies of networking events may be chosen to further study their effectiveness and evaluate their impact. Use of case study is an appropriate evaluation tool in this context because it provides the opportunity to probe further the in-depth experiences of specific target beneficiaries or a subset of beneficiaries of Baytna as a distinct part of whole. More specifically, this will allow for greater latitude in seeking out and assessing the program impact through exposing a lot more about program processes and outcome and way they interact with each other.
  • Field visits: The assessment team will have the opportunity to visit some of the awarded projects should they have the ability to. The project areas are currently limited to the provinces of Aleppo, Idleb, Raqqah, Sweida, Deir Ezzor, Hassakah, Turkey, Lebanon, and Belgium. They will be able to study Baytna’s activities in all areas, and will interview beneficiaries who agree to share information, survey target population, conduct focus groups randomly with selected beneficiaries who benefited from Baytna’s grants or capacity development programs. Field visits to the program targets will be critical for both collecting data and to building good understanding of Baytna’s target beneficiaries, geographical coverage disparities and risks related to project implementation in an authentic setting.
  • Interviews with stakeholders: The assessment team should pay particular attention to the interviewing of stakeholders, namely subgrant recipients, beneficiaries of capacity development program, Baytna staff (in Belgium, Turkey, and inside Syria), targeted communities, Baytna’s Board of Directors, Baytna’s donors and others as relevant. The main purpose for employing this methodology is to understand the impact of Baytna’s program both from the perspective of those involved and how they have benefited or affected by the interventions of this program.

ISSUES TO BE COVERED

This assessment will mainly aim at identifying any changes resulting from Baytna’s program interventions, establish causal connections between the changes and the program inputs and measure the magnitude of the change. It will particularly focus on and try to assess a wide range of broad, key and strategic performance indicators, including project effectiveness, efficiency, relevance, performance, sustainability and coverage. The impact assessment will adapt OECD/DAC evaluation criteria and concepts which defined as following:

RELEVANCE: IS THE INTERVENTION DOING THE RIGHT THINGS?

The extent to which the intervention objectives and design respond to beneficiaries (Beneficiaries is defined as, “the individuals, groups, or organizations, whether targeted or not, that benefit directly or indirectly, from the development intervention.”), global, country, and partner/institution needs, policies, and priorities, and continue to do so if circumstances change.

Note: “Respond to” means that the objectives and design of the intervention are sensitive to the economic, environmental, equity, social, political economy, and capacity conditions in which it takes place. “Partner/institution” includes government (national, regional, local), civil society organizations, private entities and international bodies involved in funding, implementing and/or overseeing the intervention. Relevance assessment involves looking at differences and trade-offs between different priorities or needs. It requires analyzing any changes in the context to assess the extent to which the intervention can be (or has been) adapted to remain relevant.

COHERENCE: HOW WELL DOES THE INTERVENTION FIT?

The compatibility of the intervention with other interventions in a country, sector or institution.

Note: The extent to which other interventions (particularly policies) support or undermine the intervention, and vice versa. Includes internal coherence and external coherence: Internal coherence addresses the synergies and interlinkages between the intervention and other interventions carried out by the same institution/government, as well as the consistency of the intervention with the relevant international norms and standards to which that institution/government adheres. External coherence considers the consistency of the intervention with other actors’ interventions in the same context. This includes complementarity, harmonization and co-ordination with others, and the extent to which the intervention is adding value while avoiding duplication of effort.

EFFECTIVENESS: IS THE INTERVENTION ACHIEVING ITS OBJECTIVES?

The extent to which the intervention achieved, or is expected to achieve, its objectives, and its results, including any differential results across groups.

Note: Analysis of effectiveness involves taking account of the relative importance of the objectives or results.

EFFICIENCY: HOW WELL ARE RESOURCES BEING USED?

The extent to which the intervention delivers, or is likely to deliver, results in an economic and timely way.

Note: “Economic” is the conversion of inputs (funds, expertise, natural resources, time, etc.) into outputs, outcomes, and impacts, in the most cost-effective way possible, as compared to feasible alternatives in the context. “Timely” delivery is within the intended timeframe, or a timeframe reasonably adjusted to the demands of the evolving context. This may include assessing operational efficiency (how well the intervention was managed).

IMPACT: WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES THE INTERVENTION MAKE?

The extent to which the intervention has generated or is expected to generate significant positive or negative, intended or unintended, higher-level effects.

Note: Impact addresses the ultimate significance and potentially transformative effects of the intervention. It seeks to identify social, environmental, and economic effects of the intervention that are longer term or broader in scope than those already captured under the effectiveness criterion. Beyond the immediate results, this criterion seeks to capture the indirect, secondary, and potential consequences of the intervention. It does so by examining the holistic and enduring changes in systems or norms, and potential effects on people’s well-being, human rights, gender equality, and the environment.

SUSTAINABILITY: WILL THE BENEFITS LAST?

The extent to which the net benefits of the intervention continue or are likely to continue.

Note: Includes an examination of the financial, economic, social, environmental, and institutional capacities of the systems needed to sustain net benefits over time. Involves analyses of resilience, risks, and potential trade-offs. Depending on the timing of the evaluation, this may involve analyzing the actual flow of net benefits or estimating the likelihood of net benefits continuing over the medium and long-term.

The following serve as guiding questions that can be integrated within the adapted OECD/DAC evaluation criteria and should be addressed based on the theory of change and results framework attached in Annex I:

  1. Did the support provided by Baytna (including grants, capacity development, networking, amongst others) reach the target group as intended, or did it reach a large portion of unintended population? Were benefits distributed fairly between gender and age groups and across social and cultural barriers?
  2. To what extend has the intervention achieved its objectives (outputs and outcomes)?
  3. To what extent are the resulted changes in the target geographical areas of Baytna consistent with the planned outputs, purpose, and goal of the evaluated intervention?
  4. To what extent can the identified changes be attributable to the intervention rather than extraneous factors? What could have been done better to make the intervention more effective?
  5. What are the intended and unintended, positive, and negative, direct or indirect, counterfactual effects of Baytna’s intervention on people and institutions?
  6. How has the intervention affected the overall situation of the target beneficiaries and stakeholders?
  7. How is the intervention consistent with the needs and priorities of the targeted communities, especially women and rural communities?
  8. In which ways the overall interventions consistent with capacity development needs and priorities of the targeted communities? Has there been discernible change in the institutional, organizational, and individual capacity in management and provision of civil society services and empowerment? What are the key capacity development changes resulted from this intervention? To what extent has the intervention contributed to capacity development and system strengthening of community-based institutions? To what extent can changes that have occurred during the period covered by the evaluation be identified and measured?
  9. What do beneficiaries and other stakeholders affected by the intervention perceive to be the effects of Baytna on themselves?
  10. To what extent can the identified changes in the target geographical areas be attributed to the intervention of Baytna? What would have occurred without the intervention of Baytna?
  11. How is Baytna’s intervention consistent and complimentary with activities supported by other LNGOs and INGOs?
  12. Is the intervention consistent and complementary with activities supported by other donor organizations? If so, to what extend can this be justified by the activities?
  13. Do the targeted beneficiaries have the (technical and financial) capacity to maintain the benefits from Baytna after cessation of external support from donors?
  14. Will the benefits produced by this intervention be maintained after cessation of external support? To what extent can it be maintained?
  15. To what extent and in what ways is the intervention supported by local institutions and well-integrated with local social and cultural conditions?
  16. To what extent is the interventions (especially small grant initiatives) identified, needs-based and initiated by the beneficiaries?
  17. Is the intervention compatible with a sustainable use of natural resources? Or is it harmful to the natural environment? How can this be justified by the results?
  18. Has the Baytna program been managed with reasonable regard for efficiency? What measures have been taken during planning and implementation to ensure that resources are efficiently used?
  19. In what ways could the intervention have been implemented with fewer resources without reducing the quality and quantity of the results?
  20. How could more of the same result have been produced with the same resources?
  21. How could an altogether different type of intervention have solved the same development problem but at a lower cost?
  22. Was the intervention economically worthwhile for the targeted communities, given possible alternative uses of the available resources? If not, how should the resources allocated to the intervention have been used for another, more worthwhile, purpose?
  23. Is the intervention producing the most appropriate impact, given the context and resources available? To what extent can this be justified by results?
  24. How efficient and effective was Baytna’s adaptation to the pandemic of COVID-19? How affected was the implementation of programs? What should have been done? Can the results be sustained? What are the missed gaps?

EVALUATION TEAM COMPOSITION AND REQUIRED COMPETENCIES

The Evaluation Team will be comprised of a team leader and technical assistants.

  1. Team Leader: The assessment should be led by an individual with competence in project/program evaluation, and who has worked with civil society support mechanisms and development particularly with more focus on gender and local community empowerment in both humanitarian and development context. A proven track record in operation in a conflict environment is a must. In particular, the Team Leader should demonstrate the following:

Essential Skills:

  • Must hold a postgraduate degree in conflict analysis, research, Project Management, or any other relevant field;
  • Must have at least 10 years professional work experience in the areas of program evaluation, especially in civil society development and capacity building in conflict settings;
  • Knowledge and/or experience of civil society’s role, including both men and women, and boy and girls in democratization processes;
  • Extensive conceptual and methodological skills and experience in applying qualitative and quantitative research evaluation methods;
  • Prior impact assessment experience is required;
  • Experience in organizational management, structures and systems, operations, capacity development, reporting, and monitoring is essential;
  • Excellent understanding of the Syrian context and conflict dynamics;
  • In country or regional similar work experience will be an added advantage;
  • Excellent communication skills necessary for building rapport with stakeholders, facilitating participation and effective presentation of result to diverse audience;
  • Perfect command of English language and working level Arabic.

Desirable qualifications:

  • Detailed knowledge of the role and development of Syrian civil society is desirable;

Prior experience in the region is an added advantage.

  1. Technical Assistance Team:

Essential qualifications:

  • Must hold a graduate degree in conflict analysis, research or any other relevant field. A bachelor’s degree with 7 years of relevant experience will be considered;
  • A minimum of 5 years of professional work experience in the areas of program evaluation, especially in civil society development and capacity building in conflict settings;
  • Knowledge and/or experience of civil society’s role, including both men and women, and boy and girls in democratization processes;
  • Extensive knowledge of and experience in applying qualitative and quantitative evaluation/research methods.
  • Prior research or evaluation research is required;
  • Excellent communicative, both spoken and written skills in Arabic and English.

Desirable qualifications:

  • Able and willing to be deployed to the provincial and district areas covered by Baytna Syria programs;

Detailed knowledge of the role and development of Syrian civil society is desirable;

REPORTING, DELIVERABLES AND SCHEDULE

All reports should be in English with accompanying annexes and visual aids.

TIMEFRAME DESCRIPTION DELIVERABLE
One week from start of contract Detailed description of the methodology to answer the evaluation questions as well as the proposed source of information and data collection procedure. The inception report should also indicate the detailed schedule for the tasks to be undergone (work plan), the activities to be implemented and the deliverables. The role and responsibilities of each member of the evaluation team should be stated as well. Inception report
25 days from start of contract At the end of the field research, the assessment team will hold a workshop with the relevant Baytna’s staff to discuss preliminary findings and conclusions of the assessment exercise to provide comments and answers Draft Evaluation Report
45 days from start of contract The Assessment report should consist of:

– Executive summary (not more than 3- 4 pages)

– Table of content

– Program description

– Evaluation purpose

– Evaluation methodology

– Main findings

– Lessons learned

– Conclusions and recommendations

– Annexes (including list of stakeholders consulted during the study, assessment ToR, maps, record of interviews and focus groups conducted, survey forms and aggregate findings, budgetary analysis, bibliography etc.)

Final Evaluation Report

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Expression of interest should be submitted to Baytna via email: procurement@baytna.org not later than 25th of March 2021 (5:00pm, Brussels time). The final decision on the candidate will be taken by 15th of April 2021. Field work should be planned accordingly. The application should comprise of: 1. A detailed technical proposal and a budget 2. An updated copy of all team member CVs including references and their contact details as well as two examples of recently completed evaluation reports.

Annex I: Theory of Change and Results Framework

Theory of Change

Assumptions:

Topics and themes will be adapted to realities on the ground to ensure effectiveness and efficacy of interventions and ensure no harm. It should be noted that Baytna-Syria’s interventions are not defined by geography or territorial control but based on the assumption that it is possible to work with partners that share the same goals and value set. It focusses on developing the skills and reach of these partners and enabling them to become the change they are looking for in line with our overall strategy and creating a network of forces for democratic change across Syria and among the refugee community. The actions and interventions are therefore partner driven and not geographically driven.

Theory of Change:

Assuming that a democratic outcome is the preferred outcome for the Syrian conflict, assuming that such an outcome cannot be achieved militarily, and assuming that, in the long run, all international actors will push for a permanent conflict resolution and stabilization along the lines of international humanitarian law and the international declaration of human rights in Syria, for civil society to act as a force for democratic change, for inclusive peace and stability, to support transitional justice, and to promote respect for human rights, it is necessary to strengthen the capacities of Syrian civil society organizations and moderate activists working inside Syria. This requires a recognized, credible, independent, and sustainable entity that networks among Syrian civil society and promotes holding wider governance institutions accountable, and that promotes public participation and empowers communities. Baytna-Syria therefore applies the following theory of change:

If Syrian Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) are able to meet and organize through a credible, recognized and sustainable forum; and

If Syrian CSOs are able to develop their technical capacity, knowledge and skills on public policy and advocacy; and,

If Syrian CSOs are empowered to implement practical initiatives in support of their communities in Syria, Baytna-Syria empowers through funding;

Then, the capacity of Syrian civil society and moderate activists inside Syria is strengthened; and;

Then, Syrian civil society will be better able to act as a force for democratic change;

Eventually contributing towards inclusive peace and stability and promoting respect for human rights.

Baytna-Syria will continue achieving this by:

  • Creating fully developed and robust management systems and structures
  • Providing services and support for Syrian civil society to meet and engage
  • Building capacities of civil society actors through high-quality trainings
  • Making grants to Syrian civil society actors in an accountable and transparent way
  • Advocating for the rights and demands of the Syrian people nationally and internationally

Overall Framework

Impact Syrian civil society (SCS) capacities are strengthened to act as a force for democratic change, inclusive peace and stability, to support transitional justice, and to promote respect for human rights and civil liberties using different tools and approaches including advocacy, lobbying and policy making.
Impact indicator Number of high-level engagements by Baytna Syria supported CSOs, CBOs, and Initiatives with international policy forums or track two meetings. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of policy recommendations formulated by Baytna Syria supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives and adopted at the local, national and/or international level. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Change in attitude and perception towards Syrian civil society.

Change in role of civil society within political process

Achievements at the accountability level (whether using universal jurisdiction or in Syria)

Inclusion of reparations and restitutions in any transitional phase or rebuilding phase in Syria

Time Planned (aggregated values over time) Actual (with date) (aggregated values over time), including reflection on whether outputs are met on time
Baseline end 2018 6 high-level engagements, 0 policy recommendations, Attitude generally neutral or slightly negative, Civil Society as a marginal participant, few accountability initiatives, no discussions on reparations and restitutions
Milestone end 2019 8 high-level engagements, 1 policy recommendations, No change in attitudes, Civil Society as a marginal participant, few accountability initiatives, no discussions on reparations and restitutions
Milestone end 2020 10 high-level engagements, 2 policy recommendations, Attitude getting more positive, Civil Society as a monitoring participant, significant indictments abroad using universal jurisdiction, discussions on reparations and restitutions on the agenda
Milestone end 2021 12 high-level engagement, 3 policy recommendations, Acceptance of role of civil society, Civil Society as an influential participant, accountability initiatives starting inside Syria, discussions on reparations and restitutions formally part of a rebuilding phase
Means of Verification Online Tracker, Field Reports, Context analysis, Impact Assessment Study, FGDs and KIIs
Outcome 1 Baytna Syria-supported civil society groups and activists effectively monitor the governing structures and the democratic processes, and document violations and promote accountability.
Outcome indicator Number of supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives that implement accountability and/or democracy focused activities. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of justice and/or violation documentation focused activities implemented by Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs and initiatives. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Change in service delivery quality.

Change in understanding and application of democratic/accountability processes.

Development of election monitoring practice

Time Planned (aggregated values over time) Actual (with date) (aggregated values over time), including reflection on whether outputs are met on time
Baseline end 2018 1 CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives that implement accountability and/or democracy focused initiative, 0 justice and/or violation documentation activities funded by Baytna Syria, service delivery below standards, average understanding of democratic processes, election monitoring practice non-existent
Target end 2019 2, 1, no change in quality, no change in understanding, election monitoring practice discussed
Target end 2020 2, 2, perceived improvement in quality, improved understanding, election monitoring practice codified
Target end 2021 3, 3, sustained improvement in quality, democratic processes practiced, election monitoring practice accepted
Means of Verification Online Tracker, Field Reports, Tracer Study, Field Questionnaires and FGDs
Outcome 2 Baytna Syria-supported civil society groups and activists foster public participation in policy making and decision-making.
Outcome indicator Number of community engagement/monitoring initiatives launched by Baytna Syria’s supported civil society actors. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of engagements/public meetings with decision makers and key stakeholders done by Baytna Syria’s supported civil society actors. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Perceived change in level of community engagement in decision making processes.

Applicability and adaptability of public policy recommendations

Acceptance of role of civil society in policy making

Time Planned (aggregated values over time) Actual (with date) (aggregated values over time), including reflection on whether outputs are met on time
Baseline end 2018 0 initiatives,2 engagements, level of community engagement in decision making is low, public policy non-existent, role not accepted
Target end 2019 1, 3, level of community engagement in decision making is understood, understanding of public policy concepts, role tolerated
Target end 2020 2,  4, level of community engagement in decision making is improved, participation in public policy formulation, role tolerated
Target end 2021 3, 5, level of community engagement in decision making is sustained, degree of inclusiveness and participation in public policy making, role formalized
Means of Verification Online Tracker, Field Reports, Tracer Study, Field Questionnaires and KIIs
Outcome 3 Baytna Syria-supported civil society groups and activists influence national and international policies to contribute to democratic change.
Outcome indicator Number of public engagement events conducted by Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives (locally, regionally, internationally). (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of participations in national and international platforms on Syria by Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Quality and impact of advocacy and recommendations made by Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives.

Change in role and mission of Syrian civil society in the political process

Change in perception of Syrian civil society by international actors

Time Planned (aggregated values over time) Actual (with date) (aggregated values over time), including reflection on whether outputs are met on time
Baseline end 2018 1 engagement, 1 participation, little impact, pure advisory role, negative perception
Target end 2019 3 engagements, 5 participations, recognized visibility, no change in role, neutral perception
Target end 2020 5 engagements, 8 participations, recommendations well circulated and understood, monitoring role, neutral perception
Target end 2021 7 engagements, 10 participations, recommendations endorsed, monitoring role plus veto power, positive perception
Means of Verification Online Tracker, Field Reports, Tracer Study, KIIs and Context evaluation
Outcome 4 Baytna Syria contributed to a more mature, diverse, and inclusive civil society narrative.
Outcome indicator Number of Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives that adopted mature and professional practices. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of capacity development activities conducted by Baytna Syria to improve partners’ maturity and professionalism. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Number of gender normalization activities implemented by Baytna Syria’s supported CSOs, CBOs, and initiatives. (Quantitative indicator needed for French MoFA)

Change in perceiving Baytna Syria by the Syrian civil society.

Acceptance and adoption of democratic values by local communities

Time Planned (aggregated values over time) Actual (with date) (aggregated values over time), including reflection on whether outputs are met on time
Baseline end 2018 5 initiatives, 44 CB activities, 0 GN activity, Baytna Syria is a donor, no understanding of values
Target end 2019 8 initiatives, 64 CB activities, 3 GN activities, no change in perception of Baytna Syria, values still vague
Target end 2020 19 initiatives, 94 CB activities, 20 GN activities, Baytna Syria is a Partner, values being understood
Target end 2021 37 initiatives, 130 CB activities, 41 GN activities, Baytna Syria is a Leader, values being practiced selectively
Means of Verification Online Tracker, Filed Reports, Field Questionnaires, FGDs and KIIs